No 1 Royal Crescent Houses

No 1 Royal Crescent
1 Royal Crescent
Bath
Somerset
BA1 2LR

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The Royal Crescent was built to the designs of John Wood the Younger between 1767 and 1774. It is justly considered one of the finest achievements of urban 18th century architecture and represents the highest point of palladian architecture in Bath.

The houses of the Royal Crescent were designed to the individual requirements of wealthy and distinguished visitors to Bath and master craftsmen were responsible for the interior decoration, using designs drawn from the many pattern books published at the time.

The foundation stone of Number 1 Royal Crescent was laid in 1767 and the house first leased to Thomas Brock in 1769. Among subsequent distinguished occupants, records show that the Duke of York, second son of George III, 'engaged the first house in the Royal Crescent' in 1776.

By 1968 'Number 1' was a lodging house and had fallen into disrepair. Major Bernard Cayzer, a member of the shipping family, acquired the house and gave it to The Bath Preservation Trust, who in turn provided funds for it's restoration. The house is now the offices of the Trust.

Only materials available in the 18th century were used. Visitors can now see a grand town house redecorated and furnished to show how it might have appeared in the late 18th century.

The Museum Shop has a wide selection of gifts and books relating to the Georgian period. Hand-made and decorated ceramics reflect traditional 18th Century designs. Classical cards, wrapping papers and textiles represent English style and are predominantly made in the UK.

An illustrated guide to No.1 Royal Crescent is on sale for £2.00.


Attraction Details

VenueNo 1 Royal Crescent
Address1 Royal Crescent, Bath, Somerset, BA1 2LR
Opening times10.30am - 5pm
Entry costs
Attraction typeHouses

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