National Railway Museum Museums

National Railway Museum
Leeman Road
York
Yorkshire
YO26 4XJ

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The National Railway Museum in York, England is the largest railway museum in the world, responsible for the conservation and interpretation of the British national collection of historically significant railway vehicles and other artefacts. The Museum contains an unrivalled collection of locomotives, rolling stock, railway equipment, documents and records

British Rail - A Moving Story

A permanent exhibition telling the story of British Rail from nationalization in 1948 to privatization in 1996. Told by those who made it happen.

Shinkansen - Japan's Bullet Train

In the 1960s Japan reinvented the passenger railway. The Shinkansen was the first railway designed to move large numbers of people in comfort at high speed, on the 'Bullet Train' The service was compared with air travel. Judge for yourself by visiting this exciting new exhibition and boarding the only Bullet Train outside Japan. See the News section for more information about the Shinkansen and its journey from Japan to England for permanent display the NRM.

Wish You Were Here

Let yourself be transported through a changing holiday landscape, from childhood memories of golden sands to a skiing trip via Eurostar. Holiday destinations have changed markedly over the last 160 years, but the railways have continued to play an important role. Catch the holiday express to this new display where fun and relaxation are the order of the day.

Other Display Themes

Royal Trains - Palaces on Wheels

How did Queen Victoria travel by train? Why did George VI have an armour-plated carriage? Walk along the red carpet and find the answers in our lavish Royal travel exhibition.

Moving Things - The Mail

Moving mail by rail is as important as ever. This interactive exhibition allows you to have a go at sorting letters, get syncopated with the poem 'Night Mail', and compare the earliest primitive sorting carriages with a modern mail train.

The Interactive Learning Centre

Interactive displays help you to understand why trains stay on the rails, why high-speed trains are streamlined, or why signal levers need to be pulled in the right order. Check out the Interactive Learning Centre in the Education section.

Travelling by Train

The earliest train travellers in open wagons would not recognize today's high-speed trains. The historic carriages on show at the NRM range from the most primitive wooden plank seat, to the opulent elegance of the first class compartment.

Models to Main line

Perfect recreations of trains of all kinds produce the impression of the main line in miniature on the NRM's recently extended gauge '0' model railway.

How Railways Work

From locomotives to track, signals to staff, and stations to bridges - the NRM displays demonstrate how each is important, and why the system can grind to a halt when one element breaks down.

Railways in Art

Railways have inspired artists to produce some of their finest work. The NRM's art collection covers watercolours, oil paintings, portraits, landscapes, as well as original artwork for some of the most famous railway posters.

Express Travel

Each railway company was keen to shave another few minutes off the journey time and make their trains more comfortable than anyone else's. Find out about the 'Races to the North', and why the Midland Railway eventually decided to allow third class passengers into its dining cars.

Commuter Travel

Quick, functional, but somewhat dreary and generally unloved. The NRM acknowledges the vital role played by these humble trains, and you can find out why electrification made such a big difference to the 08.15 to Waterloo.


Attraction Details

VenueNational Railway Museum
AddressLeeman Road, York, Yorkshire, YO26 4XJ
Opening times
Entry costs
Attraction typeMuseums

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